Presenter Information

Ryanne MikundaFollow

Abstract

The Multifaceted Process of Language Attrition

Ryanne Mikunda

Ethan Krase

This research project defines and examines the many factors that influence the process of language attrition, which is an individual's loss of skill in a language that is not caused by a medical condition, i.e., is non-pathological. To begin, this study offers a brief history of first and second language attrition to establish language attrition's role in both the fields of second language acquisition and minority language loss. This history also outlines the parameters under which language attrition is studied, and the required conditions that precede it. The most important precursor is the intersection of two languages that eventually causes a dominance shift. Next, the project divides the process of language attrition into three categories: psycholinguistic functions, personal characteristics of the language user, and variables of the surrounding social context. These sections are provided for clarity of discussion, although the multifaceted and overlapping nature of certain factors is addressed. Finally, this project explores implications for teaching, as an educational setting is often where the interaction of two languages occurs or is prolonged. Educators must understand the process of language attrition in order to make conscientious pedagogical decisions for language learners.

College

College of Liberal Arts

Department

English

Location

Eau Claire, Wisconsin

Breakout Room

19

Start Date

4-14-2021 1:00 PM

End Date

4-14-2021 1:45 PM

Presentation Type

Video (Live-Zoom)

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Apr 14th, 1:00 PM Apr 14th, 1:45 PM

The Multifaceted Process of Language Attrition

Eau Claire, Wisconsin

The Multifaceted Process of Language Attrition

Ryanne Mikunda

Ethan Krase

This research project defines and examines the many factors that influence the process of language attrition, which is an individual's loss of skill in a language that is not caused by a medical condition, i.e., is non-pathological. To begin, this study offers a brief history of first and second language attrition to establish language attrition's role in both the fields of second language acquisition and minority language loss. This history also outlines the parameters under which language attrition is studied, and the required conditions that precede it. The most important precursor is the intersection of two languages that eventually causes a dominance shift. Next, the project divides the process of language attrition into three categories: psycholinguistic functions, personal characteristics of the language user, and variables of the surrounding social context. These sections are provided for clarity of discussion, although the multifaceted and overlapping nature of certain factors is addressed. Finally, this project explores implications for teaching, as an educational setting is often where the interaction of two languages occurs or is prolonged. Educators must understand the process of language attrition in order to make conscientious pedagogical decisions for language learners.