Presentation Title

Learning from the Indigenous Roots of Sustainable Forestry in the USA: Promoting Sustainability, Community Healing, and Partnerships

Description

This lecture is co-sponsored by the All-University Arboretum and Land Stewardship Committee as part of the 8th Annual Arbor Day celebration and WSU’s “Tree-Campus USA” recognition.

Indigenous knowledge has sustained Indigenous people and their environments for thousands of years and continues today. Indigenous people often tell us that our common future depends upon incorporating their wisdom and perspectives into social, economic, and ecological decisions. However, natural resource managers, scientists, and universities have struggled to integrate this knowledge into planning, management, and research. Dr. Dockry's talk will discuss how the Indigenous roots of sustainable forestry in the USA began with the Menominee Nation in Wisconsin and how that experience can inform contemporary sustainable forestry, ecological restoration, and community healing. Dr. Dockry will finish the talk by discussing how developing partnerships with tribes and tribal communities can serve as the foundation for integrating Indigenous knowledge with western natural resource management science. Dr. Dockry will present reflections from his decades-long work with Indigenous communities and provide practical partnership-building strategies for working with tribes. The goal of Dr. Dockry's talk is to support Winona State’s efforts to build partnerships with Indigenous people to enhance ecological and social restoration to meet 21st-century challenges.

Dr. Dockry is a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation with traditional territories around Lake Michigan and a reservation in central Oklahoma. Dr. Dockry is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Forest Resources at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Dockry holds a Ph.D. in Forestry with a Minor in Geography from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, M.S. in Forest Resources from Pennsylvania State University, and B.S. in Forest Science from the University of Wisconsin Madison. Dr. Dockry has expertise in American Indian and Indigenous Natural Resource Management, Tribal Partnerships, Integration of Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Western Ecological Knowledge, Strategic Foresight and Planning, Institutional Diversity, and Environmental History.

Start Date

4-21-2021 6:30 PM

End Date

4-21-2021 7:30 PM

Presentation Type

Lecture

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Apr 21st, 6:30 PM Apr 21st, 7:30 PM

Learning from the Indigenous Roots of Sustainable Forestry in the USA: Promoting Sustainability, Community Healing, and Partnerships

This lecture is co-sponsored by the All-University Arboretum and Land Stewardship Committee as part of the 8th Annual Arbor Day celebration and WSU’s “Tree-Campus USA” recognition.

Indigenous knowledge has sustained Indigenous people and their environments for thousands of years and continues today. Indigenous people often tell us that our common future depends upon incorporating their wisdom and perspectives into social, economic, and ecological decisions. However, natural resource managers, scientists, and universities have struggled to integrate this knowledge into planning, management, and research. Dr. Dockry's talk will discuss how the Indigenous roots of sustainable forestry in the USA began with the Menominee Nation in Wisconsin and how that experience can inform contemporary sustainable forestry, ecological restoration, and community healing. Dr. Dockry will finish the talk by discussing how developing partnerships with tribes and tribal communities can serve as the foundation for integrating Indigenous knowledge with western natural resource management science. Dr. Dockry will present reflections from his decades-long work with Indigenous communities and provide practical partnership-building strategies for working with tribes. The goal of Dr. Dockry's talk is to support Winona State’s efforts to build partnerships with Indigenous people to enhance ecological and social restoration to meet 21st-century challenges.

Dr. Dockry is a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation with traditional territories around Lake Michigan and a reservation in central Oklahoma. Dr. Dockry is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Forest Resources at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Dockry holds a Ph.D. in Forestry with a Minor in Geography from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, M.S. in Forest Resources from Pennsylvania State University, and B.S. in Forest Science from the University of Wisconsin Madison. Dr. Dockry has expertise in American Indian and Indigenous Natural Resource Management, Tribal Partnerships, Integration of Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Western Ecological Knowledge, Strategic Foresight and Planning, Institutional Diversity, and Environmental History.