Presentation Title

Developing a Multiplex PCR to Amplify Borrelia burgdorferi DNA in the Presence of Ixodes scapularis DNA

Abstract

Lyme Disease is caused by a spirochete bacterium (Borrelia burgdorferi). It is transmitted by ticks of the genus Ixodes. Ixodes scapularis, more commonly known as the black-legged tick or deer tick is capable of carrying and transmitting the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi to humans and other mammals and is the species of ticks found in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Lyme Disease is a complex disease that causes a multitude of side effects both acute and chronic. It can affect multiple systems in the human body, including the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The prevalence of Lyme Disease in the Midwest is extremely high, yet lower than those in the North East.

The goal of this research was to develop a multiplex PCR that could amplify Borrelia and Ixodes simultaneously in order to determine prevalence of infected ticks from 2005-2012. Amplifying a gene in Ixodes acted as a positive control, indicating DNA in the extracted ticks were viable. Multiple PCR protocols and primers were used but only one of the two genes consistently amplified. Future research will include a RT PCR that amplifies both genes.

College

College of Science & Engineering

Department

Biology

Location

Winona, Minnesota

Breakout Room

13

Start Date

4-14-2021 3:00 PM

End Date

4-14-2021 3:45 PM

Presentation Type

Video (Live-Zoom)

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Apr 14th, 3:00 PM Apr 14th, 3:45 PM

Developing a Multiplex PCR to Amplify Borrelia burgdorferi DNA in the Presence of Ixodes scapularis DNA

Winona, Minnesota

Lyme Disease is caused by a spirochete bacterium (Borrelia burgdorferi). It is transmitted by ticks of the genus Ixodes. Ixodes scapularis, more commonly known as the black-legged tick or deer tick is capable of carrying and transmitting the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi to humans and other mammals and is the species of ticks found in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Lyme Disease is a complex disease that causes a multitude of side effects both acute and chronic. It can affect multiple systems in the human body, including the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The prevalence of Lyme Disease in the Midwest is extremely high, yet lower than those in the North East.

The goal of this research was to develop a multiplex PCR that could amplify Borrelia and Ixodes simultaneously in order to determine prevalence of infected ticks from 2005-2012. Amplifying a gene in Ixodes acted as a positive control, indicating DNA in the extracted ticks were viable. Multiple PCR protocols and primers were used but only one of the two genes consistently amplified. Future research will include a RT PCR that amplifies both genes.