Presentation Title

Seeds for Seven Generations

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Description

During this first event of the Ecological History Lecture series, Diane Wilson presented on our indigenous seeds, especially from a Dakota perspective, and on our evolving relationship with corn, one of our most important seed relatives, from indigenous gardens to contemporary farming. Diane Wilson also discussed exciting work being done today by Native organizations to reclaim our indigenous seeds as food for our communities. The topics in this presentation come from Diane Wilson’s essay, “Seeds for Seven Generations,” which was published in A Good Time for the Truth anthology (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2016).

Diane Wilson is a Dakota writer whose memoir, Spirit Car: Journey to a Dakota Past (Borealis Books) won a 2006 Minnesota Book Award and was selected for the 2012 One Minneapolis One Read program. Her 2011 nonfiction book, Beloved Child: A Dakota Way of Life (Borealis Books) was awarded the 2012 Barbara Sudler Award from History Colorado. Wilson is the current Executive Director for Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance (NAFSA) and former Executive Director for the Dream of Wild Health farm in Hugo, MN. She is a Mdewakanton descendent and enrolled on the Rosebud Reservation.

The Winona County Historical Society (WCHS) and Winona State University (WSU) collaborated on applying for a Heritage Partnership grant to support educational projects that explore the unique ecological history of the Driftless area of Minnesota. Included in this grant project was a lecture series that will host ecological experts. The lecture series was to occur in the spring of 2020 but was postponed and converted to a webinar series due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Location

Zoom webinar, Winona, Minnesota

Start Date

3-23-2021 6:30 PM

End Date

3-23-2021 7:30 PM

Presentation Type

Lecture

Keywords

The Seed Keeper; Diane Wilson; Indigenous seeds; Heirloom; Corn; Maize; Cultivated crops; Food sovereignty; Gardening; Mdewakanton; Dakota; Mni Sota Makoce; Minnesota; Dream of Wild Health; Native American Food Sovereignty

Notes

This video has been edited from the original recording. Captions available. Captions are not included for all Dakota language that is spoken and for the captions that are included do not use the orthographic markings and were provided by the presenter. Allison Quam and Kendall Larson co-hosted the lecture on the Zoom platform.

Fiscal Sponsor

This project was made possible in part by the people of Minnesota through a grant funded by an appropriation to the Minnesota Historical Society from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Rights Management

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. This video may be viewed and shared. It may not be used for commercial purposes. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the right(s) holder.

Publisher

Winona State University

City

Winona, Minnesota

Department

Special Collections - Library

Date Digital

2021-03-24 18:45

Metadata Creation Responsibility

Allison Quam

Unique Identifier

wsuecohist_2021_Wilson_Diane

Master File Format

MP4

File Type

MP4, SRT

Running Time

1 hour 6 minutes 56 seconds

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Mar 23rd, 6:30 PM Mar 23rd, 7:30 PM

Seeds for Seven Generations

Zoom webinar, Winona, Minnesota

During this first event of the Ecological History Lecture series, Diane Wilson presented on our indigenous seeds, especially from a Dakota perspective, and on our evolving relationship with corn, one of our most important seed relatives, from indigenous gardens to contemporary farming. Diane Wilson also discussed exciting work being done today by Native organizations to reclaim our indigenous seeds as food for our communities. The topics in this presentation come from Diane Wilson’s essay, “Seeds for Seven Generations,” which was published in A Good Time for the Truth anthology (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2016).

Diane Wilson is a Dakota writer whose memoir, Spirit Car: Journey to a Dakota Past (Borealis Books) won a 2006 Minnesota Book Award and was selected for the 2012 One Minneapolis One Read program. Her 2011 nonfiction book, Beloved Child: A Dakota Way of Life (Borealis Books) was awarded the 2012 Barbara Sudler Award from History Colorado. Wilson is the current Executive Director for Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance (NAFSA) and former Executive Director for the Dream of Wild Health farm in Hugo, MN. She is a Mdewakanton descendent and enrolled on the Rosebud Reservation.

The Winona County Historical Society (WCHS) and Winona State University (WSU) collaborated on applying for a Heritage Partnership grant to support educational projects that explore the unique ecological history of the Driftless area of Minnesota. Included in this grant project was a lecture series that will host ecological experts. The lecture series was to occur in the spring of 2020 but was postponed and converted to a webinar series due to the COVID-19 pandemic.